Balancing the Budget !

As election time draws near in the UK , and the US presidential election campaigns start to get underway across the Atlantic,  we’ll no doubt hear a lot about this topic shortly, if we haven’t already.  Apologies if you’ve heard this all before but the political and economic mainstream still don’t grasp it. Political parties will accuse their opponents of making “unfunded promises”, and of having “black holes” in their budgets etc . Nations’ finances will be likened to a household.

Except that Sovereign Governments, like the USA and UK are issuers of currency. They aren’t at all like a household. If a household has a deficit of say £10k pa then, generally speaking, spending cuts of £5k coupled with an extra £5k of earnings will fix the problem. How many times do we see see the same logic applied to countries too? It never works. It can’t work. Governments afterwards wonder why. It isn’t difficult to understand:

Money Flow

Money coming into the Private Domestic Sector , which is essentially what we all think of as “the economy” can only be from two sources. Government spending directly into it (Gsp) , and payments from overseas for exported goods and services. How can anyone possibly think that reducing Gsp isn’t going to affect Taxes paid? Every £ or $ collected in tax originally comes from Govt spending.

The ability of the economy to deliver taxes to the government has to be directly related to its income. Reducing its income will  make us all poorer and reduce our ability to deliver those taxes.  Spending cuts won’t do anything like as much towards reducing that deficit as is usually supposed.

How much simpler could it be?

And yet if the “balanced budget” cretins get their way what will happen?  The government will makes cuts, tax revenue will fall and the deficit will end up not much different to what it was previously. The cretins will then argue they didn’t make enough cuts and that they’ll need to make more on the second round. And so it will go on, with increased levels of unemployment and business failures at every stage.

We just can’t let this happen. It’s madness.  Instead of forcing the budget to “balance”, we should should look at balancing all the money flows to maximise our economic potential.

Eurozone electors have been sold a lemon!

Being sold a lemon means you have been tricked into buying something which is seriously defective. When you say that something is a lemon it implies that it is useless because it fails to work properly.

lemononwheels

That’s a pretty good description of the the German dictated piece of financial engineering known as the Euro. It must rate as one of their worst ever engineering efforts. Even the much maligned East German Trabi is an engineering marvel by comparison.

Trabant20-540x304

Unlike the euro system, the Trabi has a starter motor to re-start the engine  after it has stalled!

The Euro, and the GSP rules that go with it, is clearly not fit for purpose. The Greek electorate is more than justified in demanding it be fixed under warranty. However, the makers have just declined, and are even insisting that the problems are all of the customer’s own making. No-one else has reported any problems! Except the Spanish, the Irish…….

There has to come a time when the buyer has to consider a  “lemon” is much more trouble than it is worth. The buyer  needs to stop making any further payments,  ask for a refund, ask for damages too,  and ultimately get rid of it.

European lemmings!

I hope Martyn Turner doesn’t mind my addition of a second cartoon pic to his excellent first one!

Martyn_Turner_February_21_2015

Martyn_Turner_February_21_2015_2

Edit: These look more like pigs than lemmings. Gadarene swine maybe?

MMTers: Does Adair Turner have a point?

petermartin2001:

Answer to the question in this post: No he doesn’t have a point! The electorate are quite capable, as they did in the 60’s, of understanding that if monetary and fiscal policy errs too much one way we’ll end up with too much inflation. Too much the other and we’ll end up in recession.
That’s the way things were until the late 70’s. The oil shocks did produce too much inflation but it wasn’t demand led. There was a need for corrective action, but that inflation was used by the ruling class to banish Keynes completely. When -all that was needed was some modification.

Originally posted on alittleecon:

There’s quite an interesting interview with Lord Adair Turner published here. This bit in particular caught my eye:

“I think the crucial thing, the crucial question you need to answer when you accept that we can do fiat money creation is how to discipline and I’m going to address this subject in a lecture in Germany in February, because some of my very senior German friends have said to me, “Adair, you’re absolutely technically right that this is possible”, but, without quite putting it this way, they say, “we mustn’t tell the people!” Because if the people know, and if the backbenches of Parliament as well as the small elite technocrats know that this is possible, people want to do it – not to the extent of 2% of GDP or not just when we’re in a crisis – they’ll want to do it to the extent of 10%…

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